Jump to content

Radio Communications

This page helps introduce the basics of interacting with air traffic controllers in a variety of different situations. Because the purpose of this page is to teach members how to properly and efficiently operate in BVA’s air traffic control system, little detail is given on the correct operation and navigation of the aircraft. If you are interested in learning more about actually navigating and flying, visit VATSTAR, our partner ATO. VATSTAR provides in-aircraft, shared cockpit flight instruction. 

Because this document is communications-focused, it may seem to suggest that communication with ATC is the most important job of a pilot; however, this notion is incorrect. Instead, a pilot’s two highest priorities are flying and navigating the aircraft; communication is third. The phrase “Aviate, Navigate, Communicate” is often used by pilots in order to help reinforce this idea. First, fly the aircraft safely. Then, fly the aircraft in the proper direction or along the correct route. Finally, communicate with ATC. Therefore, whenever you are given an instruction from ATC, you should begin to comply with the instruction before responding to the controller. As your piloting skills become better, you will be able to aviate, navigate, and communicate almost simultaneously, but until then, remember that your most important job is to simply fly the airplane.

General Guidelines

Phonetic Alphabet, Numbers, and Call Signs

ATC radio communications make use of the FAA’s Phonetic Alphabet. These phonetic sounds should be used in place of letters. For example, taxiway ‘A’ on an airport diagram should be said on frequency as taxiway ‘Alpha’. Note that the phonetic alphabet is not used when referring to common abbreviations, such as ‘ILS’ and 'VOR'.

Altitudes are spoken in group form and rounded to the nearest hundred:

  1. 4,500 "Four thousand five hundred"
  2. 10,000 "One zero thousand"
  3. 20,000 "Flight level two zero zero"

Airline call signs are also spoken in group form when using the name of the airline:

  1. AAL1520 "American Fifteen Twenty"
  2. SWA200 "Southwest Two Hundred"

Tail number call signs (used by most general aviation aircraft) use the letter "November" followed by the individual numbers and letters. If initiated by ATC, general aviation call signs can be abbreviated as shown. The pilot may opt to replace the word "November" with the name of the aircraft's manufacturer.

  1. N8162H "November Eight One Six Two Hotel"
  2. N28DS "November Two Eight Delta Sierra"
  3. N236DR "Baron Two Three Six Delta Romeo"
  4. N6162H "Experimental Six One Six Two Hotel"
  5. N122KE "November One Two Two Kilo Echo", or "November Two Kilo Echo" (when abbreviation is initiated by ATC)
  6. N124AA "Boeing One Two Four Alpha Alpha" or "Boeing Four Alpha Alpha"  (when abbreviation is initiated by ATC)

Frequencies and other numbers are transmitted by pronouncing each digit and the period character in frequencies is spoken as 'point':

  1. 122.95 "One two two point niner five"
  2. Heading 270 "Heading two seven zero"

Initial Contact

When making contact with air traffic control for the first time, identify the controller, explain who you are, and finally what you want. Initial calls for taxi instructions should also include your position on the airport. Try to give the controller all the information necessary without being verbose. If you have a long or non-standard message that will take more than a few seconds, you may want to ask the controller if there is time for the entire request. Additionally, be sure to include any instructions from the previous controller, such as assigned headings or altitude/speed restrictions.

Always listen before transmitting. If the controller is giving an instruction to another aircraft, wait until that aircraft reads back the instruction before calling. Keep in mind that FSX has a short delay between when you change frequencies and when you actually start hearing that frequency, so be sure to wait for a few seconds of silence before you begin transmitting on a new frequency. In general, all radio calls should be kept as short and concise as possible. If you are not quite sure what to say, take a few seconds to formulate your message before transmitting.

For example:

  1. “Bradley Clearance, Delta Two, information Alpha, gate two, request IFR Clearance to Boston”
  2. “Boston Center, Cessna One Seventy Two November One Five Three Kilo Bravo, south ramp, request taxi to the active, VFR closed traffic” 
  3. “Boston Departure, November Three One One Kilo Romeo, request”
  4. “Boston Approach, JetBlue Thirty, one four thousand, information Kilo.”
  5. “Boston Approach, American Two Ten, one one thousand, descending via the ROBUC3 arrival, Runway 4R, information Bravo.”
  6. “Boston Center, Baron Five Six Three Hotel, eight thousand five hundred, VFR request.”
  7. “Bradley Approach, Delta Four Eight Three, one zero thousand, heading 280.”

Note that in the examples above, call signs are written phonetically. In subsequent examples, call signs are written as they appear in flight plans for simplicity. All other instructions, numbers, and phrases are written as they would be pronounced.

Readbacks

In almost all cases, pilots are required to repeat to the controller (readback) instructions or clearances they have been given. A readback allows the controller to ensure you have received, understand, and will comply with the information given. In most cases, readback any instructions you receive by fully repeating the instruction given and then saying your callsign. For example:

  1. Controller: “N487PH, turn left heading two eight zero, descend and maintain one two thousand.”
  2. Pilot: “Turn left heading two eight zero, descend and maintain one two thousand, N487PH.”

Remember, a readback means you are agreeing to follow the instruction given, so never readback an instruction that you do not understand or are unable to comply with. If you do not understand what a controller is asking you to do, ask for clarification. If you are unable to execute an instruction, advise the controller by responding with the phrase 'unable.' If you are not sure you heard properly, do not be afraid to ask the controller to repeat a message.

All runway hold short instructions require a full readback including the pilot's call sign:

  1. Controller: “N331PB, hold short Runway Four Right”
  2. Pilot: “Roger, N331PB" (readback is incorrect because the full hold short instruction must be heard by the controller)
  3. Controller: "N331PB, readback, hold short Runway Four Right"
  4. Pilot: "Hold short Runway Four Right, N331PB"

Changing Frequencies

When in contact with a controller, you may not change frequencies unless you have been instructed to do so. If you need to listen to an ATIS or temporarily tune another frequency, use your aircraft’s secondary radio. If your aircraft is only equipped with one radio, ask permission from the controller to leave the frequency for a few moments. For example:

  1. Pilot: “Boston Center, Cessna 2248L, request temporary frequency change to listen to the Boston ATIS.”
  2. Controller: “Cessna 2248L, frequency change approved. Advise back on frequency."

'Monitor' vs. 'Contact'

In a controller-to-controller handoff, you will be instructed to either 'monitor' or 'contact' the next frequency. If instructed to contact a new controller, change frequencies and call the new controller using the normal initial contact procedure. If instructed to monitor a new controller, change frequencies, but do not say anything; the controller will call you at the appropriate time. The ‘monitoring’ instruction is fairly common, and is mostly used when a ground controller is switching several aircraft to a busy tower frequency. By using ‘monitor’ instead of ‘contact,’ the tower controller is able to call aircraft as needed rather than having the frequency flooded by several pilots trying to check in at the same time.

Pilot Reports (PIREPs)

When flying in adverse weather conditions such as low visibility, low ceilings, thunderstorms, icing, turbulence, and wind shear, pilots are encouraged to provide pilot reports (PIREPs) to controllers. When submitting a PIREP, provide your location in relation to either a VOR or an airport, altitude, aircraft type, conditions encountered, and time that you encountered those conditions. Because submitting a PIREP is a fairly lengthy transmission, ask the controller if it is an appropriate time to transmit before proceeding with the full report. For example:

  1. Pilot: “Burlington Approach, Cessna 65145, PIREP.”
  2. Controller: “Cessna 65145, go ahead.”
  3. Pilot: "Cessna 65145, one two miles east of the Burlington VOR at four thousand five hundred, type C172, time one six five five Zulu, observed moderate turbulence and light rime icing."
  4. Controller: "Cessna 65145, PIREP received."

Communication Tips

  1. DO Readback instructions given by ATC. Remember that reading back all runway hold short instructions is mandatory.
  2. DO Make pilot reports (PIREPs) of adverse weather conditions that will be helpful to other aircraft.
  3. DO Make appropriate position reports on UNICOM frequencies using the guidelines in the 'Uncontrolled VFR Flights' section.
  4. DO Make special requests, such as a desired approach or arrival runway, with ATC as early as possible.
  5. DO Listen to and report having an airport’s ATIS, when published, before checking in with that airport’s approach or tower controller.
  6. DO NOT Readback an instruction that you do not understand or are unable to comply with.
  7. DO NOT Leave a controller’s frequency until instructed to do so by that controller.
  8. DO NOT Call a new frequency that you were instructed to 'monitor' until the controller calls you.
  9. DO NOT Use extraneous terms such as 'with you', 'this is', or 'checking in', when transmitting on frequency.
  10. DO NOT Over-communicate on UNICOM/CTAF/advisory frequencies

Air Traffic Control Positions

When flying with BVA controllers, you will encounter a number of different controllers operating a variety of positions. Each of the control positions is briefly outlined below; the positions are listed by increasing of scope of control. Note that BVA controllers often consolidate positions in order to more effectively provide air traffic control services to pilots. To learn more about contacting ATC, see the Who do I Talk To? page of the Getting Started Guide.

Clearance Delivery

The clearance delivery controller provides IFR and VFR clearances, including expected navigation and altitude information, to aircraft before departure.

Ground

The ground controller is responsible for aircraft movement on taxiways and non-active runways. Ground issues inbound and outbound taxi instructions.

Tower

The tower controller is responsible for aircraft movements on active runways as well as the airspace immediately surrounding the airport. Tower issues takeoff and landing clearances while maintaining separation between certain aircraft within the immediate vicinity of the airport.

Approach/Departure

Approach and departure controllers manage the airspaces around major primary airports, called TRACONs (Terminal Radar Approach Control). An approach controller’s airspace might cover several airports, extend up to 60 miles from the primary airport, and often extends to 10,000’ or more above the surface. Approach and departure controllers provide vectors, instructions, and clearances to IFR and VFR aircraft who are not operating in the immediate vicinity of the primary airport.

Center

Center controllers are responsible for a large airspace that normally spans multiple states. A center’s airspace can be hundreds of miles wide and includes airspace up to 60,000' MSL. These areas are called ARTCCs (Area Route Traffic Control Centers). Center controllers handle enroute aircraft as well as provide approach services at airports without a dedicated approach controller.

Controlled VFR Flights

Clearance

A specific VFR clearance is not required for VFR flight in any airspace except Class B. The only requirement to operate in Class C and D airspace is to establish two-way radio communication with air traffic control. Therefore, when departing VFR from a Class C or D airport, contact the appropriate controller when you are ready for taxi. If you have not filed a flight plan, include your direction of flight, aircraft type, and intended cruising altitude when making your taxi request. 

VFR aircraft often request flight following: traffic advisories, weather information, and frequency changes provided by ATC to VFR pilots. Flight following is provided by ATC on a workload-permitting basis and must be requested by the pilot. When receiving flight following, you are assigned a discrete squawk code and remain in contact with ATC throughout the flight. A request for flight following may be made at any point during a VFR flight; however, it is preferred that you request it from the controller when obtaining taxi instructions.

  1. Pilot: "Nantucket Ground, Cessna 311PB, request taxi, VFR departure to Bradley at four thousand five hundred, request flight following."
  2. Controller: "Cessna 311PB, Nantucket Ground. Departure frequency one one eight point two squawk one two five four. Runway Two Four, taxi via Echo."
  3. Pilot: "Departure frequency one one eight point two squawk one two five four, Runway 24, taxi via Echo, Cessna 311PB."

Aircraft departing a Class B airport must obtain a special clearance to operate in the Class B Airspace; therefore, they must correctly readback a Class B VFR clearance before receiving taxi instructions.

  1. Pilot: "Boston Ground, Cessna 9634H, Signature, information Kilo, request taxi, VFR departure to Bradley at six thousand five hundred."
  2. Controller: "Cessna 9634H, Boston Ground. Cleared out of the Boston Class Bravo Airspace at or below three thousand. Departure frequency one three three point zero. Squawk one two two two."
  3. Pilot: "Cleared out of the Boston Class Bravo Airspace at or below three thousand. Departure frequency one three three point zero. Squawk one two two two, Cessna 9634H."
  4. Controller: "Cessna 34H, readback correct. Runway Four Left, intersection Quebec, taxi via Bravo, Quebec."
  5. Pilot: "Runway Four Left, intersection Quebec, via Bravo, Quebec. Cessna 34H"

Taxi

Before taxiing, you must first determine if you will require a pushback. In most cases, only airliners parked at gates need a pushback; general aviation aircraft located on parking ramps can normally begin taxiing unassisted. Note that if you need a pushback and will be pushing onto a movement area such as a taxiway, you must first obtain approval from the ground controller in order to pushback. If you will be pushing back onto a non-movement area, such as a ramp, apron, or parking area, you may begin pushing at your own discretion, but keep an eye out for other traffic. In the United States, starting and shutting down engines is always at the discretion of the pilot; there is no need to request a clearance to start your engines unless specifically instructed to do so by a controller. 

  1. Pilot: "Boston Ground, DAL231, request pushback."
  2. Controller: "DAL231, Boston Ground, pushback onto Alpha is approved. Advise ready to taxi."

After your engines are started and you are ready to go, request taxi instructions from the controller. These instructions will include a departure runway, taxi route, and possibly a runway crossing instruction, hold short instruction, give way instruction, or a squawk code. Readback of runway hold short instructions and squawk codes is mandatory, and you should always try to read back the entire taxi instruction in order to verify that it is correct. Remember that while taxiing, you may never cross a runway without a specific crossing instruction from ATC, even if the controller didn’t tell you to hold short of the runway.

  1. "N587KE, Runway Niner, taxi via Kilo, Mike, cross Runway Four Left."
  2. "American 862, Runway Two Two Right, taxi via Alpha and November, cross Runway One Five Right, hold short Runway One Five Left. Give way to a Delta Boeing 737 taxiing right to left on Alpha."

Departure

Once holding short of your departure runway, contact the appropriate controller for takeoff clearance. If instructed to line up and wait, taxi onto the runway, line up with the center line, prepare for takeoff, and then wait for an actual takeoff clearance from the controller. If the phrase 'no delay' or 'expedite' is included in your takeoff clearance, taxi onto the runway and takeoff in one continuous motion without stopping or slowing down on the runway. If you are unable to accept an immediate takeoff, hold short of the runway and inform the controller of your intentions, using the word 'unable' in your transmission. All takeoff clearances and line up and wait instructions will include your runway number and, if applicable, your intersection; if the runway number or intersection is wrong—or if your heading doesn’t match the runway number—ask the controller for clarification to make sure you have the correct clearance.

For VFR aircraft, the takeoff clearance will include either a heading to fly or a departure instruction corresponding to a leg of the traffic pattern (normally a right or left crosswind or downwind). When given a traffic pattern leg, fly the pattern in the direction indicated and extend the assigned leg until clear of the pattern or cleared on course by the controller. For example, if you are given a left downwind departure, fly a standard left traffic pattern until on the downwind leg. Once on downwind, continue straight ahead until clear of the pattern, and then proceed on course.

  1. "N7628L, left crosswind departure approved, Runway Seven, cleared for takeoff."
  2. "DAL231, Runway One Six Left, line up and wait. Traffic, Heavy Boeing 747 on a three mile final for the crossing runway."
  3. "N654HD, traffic, twin Cessna on a four mile final, Runway Two Four, cleared for immediate takeoff."

Enroute

Once airborne, fly the heading or departure leg assigned by the tower controller. If the airport is busy, you may be given altitude/speed restrictions or traffic advisories, so be ready to readback and comply with such instructions. Once you are clear of the airport's airspace, the controller will give you a frequency change to either an enroute controller or UNICOM, depending on whether or not you requested flight following. If instructed to change to UNICOM, monitor the UNICOM frequency while proceeding with your flight and provide position reports to other traffic as necessary. If you are instructed to contact an enroute controller, you will stay in communication with air traffic controllers, who will give you altimeter updates, traffic advisories, and frequency handoffs as you proceed to your destination.

  1. "N7648R, frequency change approved."
  2. "N7628L, contact Boston Center one two four point five two."

Approach

If you are receiving flight following, air traffic control will give you the appropriate handoffs and pattern entry instructions as you near your destination. If you did not request flight following, you must contact the appropriate approach or tower controller when approaching your destination. In general, it is good practice to establish two-way radio communication with air traffic control at least 15 miles from your destination airport, well prior to entering controlled airspace. Once again, a specific clearance is required before you can enter Class B airspace. If you are unfamiliar with the different airspaces and which controller to contact, VFR Flights 1, 2, and 3 of the Pilot Ratings Program can provide further information on the subject. 

In Class C or D airspace, the controller will give you pattern entry instructions and a landing clearance. In Class B airspace, the controller will first give you a squawk code, followed by radar identification, and then a clearance into the Class B airspace. Once you have received and read back the clearance, the controller will give you appropriate pattern entry and landing instructions. The phrase 'Cleared to land' authorizes you to make a full stop landing only (or, if something goes wrong, to go around). You can also be given 'cleared for the option', which allows you to make a full stop landing, touch and go, stop and go, or low approach. If the airport is busy, the controller may give you traffic advisories and instructions for sequencing between other aircraft, so ensure that you have the appropriate charts and general knowledge needed to handle these requests.

  1. "N3948Y, make straight in Runway 6."
  2. "N3987U, squawk one two four seven." Then... "N3987U, radar contact one zero miles south of Boston, cleared into the Boston Class Bravo airspace via direct Boston, maintain VFR at or below two thousand."
  3. "N468JF, extend downwind, tower will call the base."
  4. "N4396H, traffic eleven o'clock and four miles, Dash Eight at two thousand five hundred." Traffic reported in sight... "N4396H, follow that traffic, caution wake turbulence, Runway Three Three, cleared to land."

After Landing

After touching down on the runway, air traffic control will give you a turnoff instruction followed by a taxi route to either a gate or parking, depending upon your aircraft. Once parked at the gate, engine shut down is at your own discretion. Because you landed at a controlled airport, your flight plan will be closed automatically.

Uncontrolled VFR Flights

When departing, make announcements prior to taxi and prior to taxiing onto the runway for departure. When arriving, announce your position 10 miles away from the airport, on each leg of the traffic pattern, and when clearing the runway after landing. Announcements beyond these are normally unnecessary, but can be made if you believe additional information will help avoid a conflict with another aircraft. You should never announce details such as your route, cruise altitude, estimated time of arrival, etc. unless those details are directly relevant. Normally, extraneous details will not help other pilots and serve only to congest the frequency. For BVA’s purposes, if no controller is online whose airspace covers a specific airport, that airport is deemed uncontrolled.

  1. "Concord Traffic, N376FR departing Runway Three Five to the south, Concord."
  2. "Provincetown Traffic, Cair 239 one zero miles east, will make straight in Runway Seven, full stop, Provincetown."
  3. "Northampton Traffic, N578ED on downwind Runway One Four, touch and go, Northampton."
  4. "Mansfield Traffic, N394NE clear of Runway Three Two."
   

Controlled IFR Flights

Clearance

Aircraft that intend to fly IFR generally must first file an IFR flight plan and receive an IFR clearance from an air traffic controller. The acronym 'CRAFT' is often used by pilots and controllers in order to aid in correctly giving and reading back IFR clearances, as they normally contain the following items:

  1. Clearance Limit (normally your destination airport)
  2. Route of Flight (including a departure procedure, if applicable)
  3. Altitude (normally an altitude to maintain and a time by which to expect a higher altitude)
  4. Departure Frequency
  5. Transponder (squawk) Code

Once air traffic control issues your clearance, it is good practice to read back the entire clearance. Since clearances tend to be long and include a lot of information, it is a good idea to write down your clearance in an abbreviated form so you do not forget it.

  1. "Delta 273, cleared to the Kennedy airport via the SSOXS5 departure, then as filed. Climb via SID. Departure frequency one three three point zero. Squawk two five four one."

Taxi
Refer to the 'Taxi' paragraph of the 'Controlled VFR Flights' section.

 

Departure
Once holding short of your departure runway, contact the appropriate controller for takeoff clearance. If instructed to line up and wait, taxi onto the runway, line up with the center line, prepare for takeoff, and then wait for an actual takeoff clearance from the controller. If the phrase 'no delay' or 'immediate' is included in your takeoff clearance, taxi onto the runway and takeoff in one continuous motion without stopping or slowing down on the runway. If you are unable to accept an immediate takeoff, hold short of the runway and inform the controller of your intentions, using the word 'unable' in your transmission.

All takeoff clearances and line up and wait instructions will include your runway number and, if applicable, your intersection; if the runway number or intersection is wrong—or if your heading doesn’t match the runway number—ask the controller for clarification to make sure you have the correct clearance.

If you filed or were assigned a Standard Instrument Departure (SID) in your clearance, you must comply with the procedure after takeoff. If the SID includes an assigned heading, or if you were assigned a heading to fly in your IFR clearance or were given one by a tower controller, you are expected to turn to that heading immediately after reaching 400' above the airport elevation, unless the SID prescribes alternative instructions.

  1. "N478JF, fly heading one four zero, Runway Two Two Right, cleared for takeoff."
  2. "DAL231, Runway One Six Left, line up and wait. Traffic, Heavy Boeing 747 on a three mile final for the crossing runway."
  3. "N654HD, Runway Two Four, cleared for immediate takeoff. Traffic, twin Cessna on a four mile final."

Enroute
Once airborne, you will receive a number of instructions and clearances from ATC, including headings, altitudes, handoffs, and traffic advisories. Read back and comply with any instructions that you are given.

  1. "United 397, radar contact, climb and maintain one three thousand, turn right heading two four zero."
  2. "American 378, proceed direct SSOXS, resume own navigation."
Approach

As you approach your destination airport, obtain the ATIS either by tuning to the frequency on a second radio, or by requesting the ATIS through text. Each ATIS broadcast is assigned a phoenetic letter identifier which will be included at the beginning and end of each broadcast. After acquiring the broadcast, inform the controller that you have the current ATIS information (i.e., "have information Echo"). If you would like a different approach from the one that the ATIS said you should expect, inform the controller as soon as possible. As you get closer to the airport, the approach controller will give you a variety of instructions to get you on the approach, so ensure that you have any necessary charts available and that your full attention is devoted to aviating, navigating, and communicating.

The radio phraseology used for approach clearances varies with the type of approach, your position, and the way in which you will join the final approach course. A few examples are provided in the sample audio clips but a comprehensive discussion of instrument approaches is beyond the scope of this page. Members interested in learning more about instrument approach procedures should consider joining the Pilot Ratings Program.

After Landing
Refer to the 'After Landing' paragraph of the 'Controlled VFR Flights' section.

Uncontrolled IFR Flights

Real-world IFR flights are rarely operated without being in communication with ATC. However, because BVA's controllers are not always online, pilots can encounter situations where airports that are staffed 24/7 in the real-world, such as Boston, are uncontrolled in the server during non-peak hours. When you encounter these types of situations, such as an IFR landing at Boston when ATC is offline, make normal position announcements on UNICOM as if you were operating VFR out of an uncontrolled airport.

The remainder of this section discusses radio communications for an IFR flight flying into a normally untowered airport with an overlying controller online, such as a business jet flying into a Class E airport with a Center controller online. 

Clearance
Because you are departing IFR from an untowered airport, you must contact the approach or center controller who controls the airspace around your departure airport in order to obtain an IFR clearance. The controller will give you a clearance similar to a normal IFR clearance, which you should then read back. Refer to the 'Clearance' paragraph of the 'Controlled IFR Flights' section for more information on reading back IFR clearances.

If your readback is correct, the controller will either release or hold you for departure. If you are released for departure, the controller will provide you with a clearance void time, which is the time by which you must depart the airport. If you have not contacted the controller airborne by this time, your IFR clearance becomes void and you must re-contact the controller for a new clearance. If another IFR aircraft has already been cleared into or out of your departure airport, the controller will hold you and provide an estimated release time. 

  1. "N367DP, readback correct. Released for departure at one four four eight Zulu, clearance void one five two zero Zulu. Report airborne on this frequency."
  2. "N367DP, readback correct. Hold for departure. Expect release in one zero minutes."

Taxi
Because you are departing from an uncontrolled airport, make announcements on UNICOM for taxi and takeoff as if you were operating VFR. It is your responsibility to select a departure runway, taxi to it, and take off safely. Refer to the 'Uncontrolled VFR Flights' section for more information on making UNICOM announcements.

Departure
After departing, contact the controller who gave you your IFR clearance and check in with your altitude and position. The controller will then give you a squawk code and radar identify you, at which point your flight will be treated like any other normal IFR flight.

Enroute
Refer to the 'Enroute' paragraph of the 'Controlled IFR Flights' section.

Approach
Most of the approach process will be identical to an IFR approach at a controlled airport. Once you are established on the approach, instead of handing you off to a tower controller, the controller will give you a frequency change to UNICOM. After this handoff, switch to UNICOM and announce your intentions as you would if you were VFR aircraft arriving at an uncontrolled airport. Refer to the 'Uncontrolled VFR Flights' section for more information on making UNICOM announcements.

  1. Controller: "N367DP, frequency change approved, report IFR cancellation or missed approach this frequency."
  2. Pilot: "Frequency changed approved, N367DP."
  3. Pilot: "Presque Isle Traffic, N367DP eight mile final, ILS runway one approach, Presque Isle."

After Landing
Once you are on the ground and have safely cleared the runway, you must call the controller who gave you your approach clearance to cancel your IFR flight plan. After the controller has acknowledged that your flight plan has been closed, you may return to the UNICOM frequency and taxi to parking at your discretion. If you execute a missed approach, you must call the controller and report a missed approach so that he can re-sequence you for another approach.

  1. Pilot: "Boston Center, N367DP on the ground at Presque Isle, request IFR cancellation."
  2. Controller: "N367DP, IFR cancellation received at one one four five Zulu." 
 

Proud to Support the Community

About Boston Virtual ARTCC

We are a free, immersive, and realistic air traffic control community for pilots and aviation enthusiasts. We provide air traffic control within the Boston ARTCC on VATSIM. We are not affiliated with the FAA, or the real-world Boston Center facility.

×
×
  • Create New...